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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 275062, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/275062
Research Article

Creating Well-Being: Increased Creativity and proNGF Decrease following Quadrato Motor Training

1Department of Biology and Biotechnology “Charles Darwin”, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy
2Institute of Biology and Molecular Pathology, National Research Council (CNR), 00185 Rome, Italy
3Department of Movement, Human and Health Sciences, Italian University for Sport and Movement, Rome, Italy
4Research Institute for Neuroscience, Education and Didactics, Patrizio Paoletti Foundation, Via Cristoforo Cecci 2, Santa Maria degli Angeli, 06081 Assisi, Italy

Received 18 August 2014; Accepted 16 November 2014

Academic Editor: Patricia Gerbarg

Copyright © 2015 Sabrina Venditti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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