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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 286972, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/286972
Research Article

Analysis of the Isomerase and Chaperone-Like Activities of an Amebic PDI (EhPDI)

Facultad de Ciencias Químicas e Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Calzada Universidad 14418, Parque Industrial Internacional, 22390 Tijuana, BCN, Mexico

Received 10 August 2014; Revised 20 November 2014; Accepted 24 November 2014

Academic Editor: Yun-Peng Chao

Copyright © 2015 Rosa E. Mares et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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