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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 308461, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/308461
Research Article

The Interplay between Cyclic AMP, MAPK, and NF-κB Pathways in Response to Proinflammatory Signals in Microglia

1The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
2Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
3Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
4Department of Cell Biology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
5The Neuroscience Program, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
6The Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA

Received 27 August 2014; Revised 15 December 2014; Accepted 15 December 2014

Academic Editor: Paul Evans

Copyright © 2015 Mousumi Ghosh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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