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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 314796, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/314796
Review Article

Myocardial Dysfunction and Shock after Cardiac Arrest

1Division of Cardiology, UPMC Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh Presbyterian Hospital, 200 Lothrop Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
2Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Presbyterian Hospital, 200 Lothrop Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
3Safar Center for Resuscitation Research, University of Pittsburgh Presbyterian Hospital, 200 Lothrop Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA

Received 22 May 2015; Accepted 28 June 2015

Academic Editor: Spyros Mentzelopoulos

Copyright © 2015 Jacob C. Jentzer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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