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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 321740, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/321740
Review Article

Lesser-Known Molecules in Ovarian Carcinogenesis

1Department of Morpho-Functional Sciences, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Grigore T. Popa”, 16 University Street, 700115 Iaşi, Romania
2Department of Mother and Child Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Grigore T. Popa”, 16 University Street, 700115 Iaşi, Romania

Received 9 January 2015; Revised 14 June 2015; Accepted 7 July 2015

Academic Editor: Fatima Mechta-Grigoriou

Copyright © 2015 Ludmila Lozneanu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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