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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 340218, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/340218
Research Article

MiR-183 Regulates ITGB1P Expression and Promotes Invasion of Endometrial Stromal Cells

1State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Gynecology, Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, 123 Tianfei Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210029, China
2Shanghai Ji Ai Genetics & IVF Institute, Obstetrics & Gynecology Hospital, Fudan University, 588 Fangxie Road, Shanghai 200011, China

Received 14 January 2015; Accepted 24 February 2015

Academic Editor: Shi-Wen Jiang

Copyright © 2015 Jie Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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