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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 342982, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/342982
Review Article

Effects of Abiotic Factors on HIPV-Mediated Interactions between Plants and Parasitoids

1French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, UMR 1355-7254, Institut Sophia Agrobiotech, 06903 Sophia Antipolis, France
2Institut de Chimie de Nice, UMR CNRS 7272, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2, France

Received 1 September 2015; Accepted 5 November 2015

Academic Editor: Johannes Stökl

Copyright © 2015 Christine Becker et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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