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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 351289, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/351289
Review Article

Oxidative Stress Control by Apicomplexan Parasites

1Unit for Drug Discovery, Department of Parasitology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, Avenida Professor Lineu Prestes 1374, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Department of Molecular Physiology, Westfälische Wilhelms-University Münster, Schlossplatz 8, 48143 Münster, Germany

Received 3 August 2014; Accepted 27 October 2014

Academic Editor: Kevin Tyler

Copyright © 2015 Soraya S. Bosch et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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