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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 370274, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/370274
Research Article

The Adoption of Smoking and Its Effect on the Mortality Gender Gap in Netherlands: A Historical Perspective

1Population Research Centre, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
2Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute (NIDI/KNAW), The Hague, Netherlands

Received 19 December 2014; Revised 22 February 2015; Accepted 24 February 2015

Academic Editor: Kamran Siddiqi

Copyright © 2015 Fanny Janssen and Frans van Poppel. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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