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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 376423, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/376423
Research Article

DNA Methylation Levels of Melanoma Risk Genes Are Associated with Clinical Characteristics of Melanoma Patients

1International Research Center, A.C.Camargo Cancer Center, Rua Taguá 440, 01508010 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Federal Technological University of Paraná, Avenida Alberto Carazzai 1640, 86300000 Cornélio Procópio, PR, Brazil
3School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, Avenida Professor Lineu Prestes 580, 05508000 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
4Department of Oncogenetics, A.C.Camargo Cancer Center, Rua Professor Antônio Prudente 211, 01509010 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
5Department of Pathology, A.C.Camargo Cancer Center, Rua Professor Antônio Prudente 211, 01509010 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
6Skin Cancer Department, A.C.Camargo Cancer Center, Rua Professor Antônio Prudente 211, 01509010 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
7Department of Genetics and Evolutionary Biology, Institute of Biosciences, University of São Paulo, Rua do Matão 277, 05508090 São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 21 January 2015; Accepted 23 March 2015

Academic Editor: Rajiv Kumar

Copyright © 2015 Érica S. S. de Araújo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

In melanoma development, oncogenic process is mediated by genetic and epigenetic mutations, and few studies have so far explored the role of DNA methylation either as predisposition factor or biomarker. We tested patient samples for germline CDKN2A methylation status and found no evidence of inactivation by promoter hypermethylation. We have also investigated the association of clinical characteristics of samples with the DNA methylation pattern of twelve genes relevant for melanomagenesis. Five genes (BAP1, MGMT, MITF, PALB2, and POT1) presented statistical association between blood DNA methylation levels and either CDKN2A-mutation status, number of lesions, or Breslow thickness. In tumors, five genes (KIT, MGMT, MITF, TERT, and TNF) exhibited methylation levels significantly different between tumor groups including acral compared to nonacral melanomas and matched primary lesions and metastases. Our data pinpoint that the methylation level of eight melanoma-associated genes could potentially represent markers for this disease both in peripheral blood and in tumor samples.