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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 402386, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/402386
Review Article

Cytotoxic and Antitumor Activity of Sulforaphane: The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species

1Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino “Carlo Bo”, 61029 Urbino, Italy
2Department for Life Quality Studies, Alma Mater Studiorum-University of Bologna, 47921 Rimini, Italy

Received 17 September 2014; Revised 3 December 2014; Accepted 31 May 2015

Academic Editor: Afaf K. El-Ansary

Copyright © 2015 Piero Sestili and Carmela Fimognari. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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