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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 413262, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/413262
Research Article

DNASynth: A Computer Program for Assembly of Artificial Gene Parts in Decreasing Temperature

1Institute of Electronic Systems, Warsaw University of Technology, Nowowiejska 15/19, 00-665 Warsaw, Poland
2Institute of Biotechnology and Antibiotics, Staroscinska 5, 02-512 Warsaw, Poland

Received 30 May 2014; Revised 8 October 2014; Accepted 11 October 2014

Academic Editor: Jiangke Yang

Copyright © 2015 Robert M. Nowak et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Artificial gene synthesis requires consideration of nucleotide sequence development as well as long DNA molecule assembly protocols. The nucleotide sequence of the molecule must meet many conditions including particular preferences of the host organism for certain codons, avoidance of specific regulatory subsequences, and a lack of secondary structures that inhibit expression. The chemical synthesis of DNA molecule has limitations in terms of strand length; thus, the creation of artificial genes requires the assembly of long DNA molecules from shorter fragments. In the approach presented, the algorithm and the computer program address both tasks: developing the optimal nucleotide sequence to encode a given peptide for a given host organism and determining the long DNA assembly protocol. These tasks are closely connected; a change in codon usage may lead to changes in the optimal assembly protocol, and the lack of a simple assembly protocol may be addressed by changing the nucleotide sequence. The computer program presented in this study was tested with real data from an experiment in a wet biological laboratory to synthesize a peptide. The benefit of the presented algorithm and its application is the shorter time, compared to polymerase cycling assembly, needed to produce a ready synthetic gene.