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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 426379, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/426379
Research Article

Prenatal Diagnosis of Central Nervous System Anomalies by High-Resolution Chromosomal Microarray Analysis

1Department of Ultrasound, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100026, China
2Department of Biomedical Science, Mercer University School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Memorial Health Hospital, 4700 Waters Avenue, Savannah, GA 31404-3089, USA
3Department of Obstetrics, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100026, China

Received 15 January 2015; Accepted 7 April 2015

Academic Editor: Marco Fichera

Copyright © 2015 Lijuan Sun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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