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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 426429, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/426429
Research Article

Progesterone and Src Family Inhibitor PP1 Synergistically Inhibit Cell Migration and Invasion of Human Basal Phenotype Breast Cancer Cells

1Department of Geriatrics, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, 87 Xiangya Road, Changsha, Hunan 410008, China
2Department of Respiratory, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, 87 Xiangya Road, Changsha, Hunan 410008, China
3Laboratory of Cancer Experimental Therapy, Atlanta Research & Educational Foundation (151F), Atlanta VA Medical Center, 1670 Clairmont Road, Decatur, GA 30033, USA
4Department of Oncology, Shanghai Seventh People’s Hospital, 358 Datong Road, Pudong New District, Shanghai 200137, China
5Medical Service, Atlanta VA Medical Center and Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Lipids, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Decatur, GA 30033, USA

Received 10 July 2014; Accepted 19 November 2014

Academic Editor: Sandeep Singh

Copyright © 2015 Mingxuan Xie et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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