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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 436030, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/436030
Research Article

UV-Heat Treatments for the Control of Foodborne Microbial Pathogens in Chicken Broth

1Tecnología de los Alimentos, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50013 Zaragoza, Spain
2Department of Microbial and Molecular Systems (M2S), Laboratory of Food Microbiology, KU Leuven, 3001 Leuven, Belgium

Received 10 December 2014; Accepted 1 March 2015

Academic Editor: Avelino Alvarez-Ordóñez

Copyright © 2015 M. Gouma et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

This investigation established the process criteria for using UV-C light and mild heat (UV-H treatment) to inactivate 5-Log10 cycles (performance criterion) of common foodborne pathogen populations, Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, when inoculated in chicken broth. To define the target microorganism and the proper UV-H treatment conditions (including UV dose, treatment time, and temperature) that would achieve the stated performance criterion, mathematical equations based on Geeraerd’s model were developed for each microorganism. For the sake of comparison, inactivation equations for heat treatments were also performed on the same chicken broth and for the same microorganisms. L. monocytogenes was the most UV-H resistant microorganism at all temperatures, requiring a UV dose between 6.10 J/mL (5.6 min) and 2.26 J/mL (2.09 min) to achieve 5-Log10 reductions. In comparison with UV treatments at room temperatures, the combination of UV and mild heat allowed both the UV dose and treatment time to be reduced by 30% and 63% at 55°C and 60°C, respectively. Compared to heat treatments, the UV-H process reduced the heating time for 5-Log10 reductions of all the investigated microorganisms in chicken broth from 20-fold to 2-fold when the operating temperature varied from 53 to 60°C.