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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 468548, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/468548
Research Article

Dissociation of Calcium Transients and Force Development following a Change in Stimulation Frequency in Isolated Rabbit Myocardium

Department of Physiology and Cell Biology and D. Davis Heart Lung Institute, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, 304 Hamilton Hall, 1645 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1218, USA

Received 6 May 2014; Revised 1 August 2014; Accepted 19 August 2014

Academic Editor: Danuta Szczesna-Cordary

Copyright © 2015 Kaylan M. Haizlip et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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