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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 475935, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/475935
Research Article

A Tissue Retrieval and Postharvest Processing Regimen for Rodent Reproductive Tissues Compatible with Long-Term Storage on the International Space Station and Postflight Biospecimen Sharing Program

1Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Mail Stop 3050, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, HLSIC 3098, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA
2Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA
3Institute for Reproductive Health and Regenerative Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA

Received 6 June 2014; Revised 18 September 2014; Accepted 20 October 2014

Academic Editor: Jack J. W. A. Van Loon

Copyright © 2015 Vijayalaxmi Gupta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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