Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 479140, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/479140
Research Article

The Effects of Bifidobacterium breve on Immune Mediators and Proteome of HT29 Cells Monolayers

1Department of Microbiology and Biochemistry of Dairy Products, Instituto de Productos Lácteos de Asturias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (IPLA-CSIC), Paseo Río Linares s/n, Villaviciosa, 33300 Asturias, Spain
2Department of Functional Biology, Immunology Area, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, 33006 Asturias, Spain

Received 15 May 2014; Revised 3 October 2014; Accepted 4 October 2014

Academic Editor: Riitta Korpela

Copyright © 2015 Borja Sánchez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. Food and Health Agricultural Organization of the United Nations and World Health Organization, “Guidelines for the evaluation of probiotics in food,” Working Group Report, FAO/WHO, Ontario, Canada, 2002. View at Google Scholar
  2. T. Yatsunenko, F. E. Rey, M. J. Manary et al., “Human gut microbiome viewed across age and geography,” Nature, vol. 486, no. 7402, pp. 222–227, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. M. C. Collado, M. Gueimonde, and G. Pérez-Martínez, “Current and future applications of probiotics,” Current Nutrition and Food Science, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 170–180, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. M. G. Gareau, P. M. Sherman, and W. A. Walker, “Probiotics and the gut microbiota in intestinal health and disease.,” Nature reviews. Gastroenterology & hepatology, vol. 7, no. 9, pp. 503–514, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. N. Binns, Probiotics, Prebiotics and the Gut Microbiota, ILSI Europe Concise Monograph Series, International Life Sciences Institute, 2013.
  6. C. L. Maynard, C. O. Elson, R. D. Hatton, and C. T. Weaver, “Reciprocal interactions of the intestinal microbiota and immune system,” Nature, vol. 489, no. 7415, pp. 231–241, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. H. R. Christensen, H. Frøkiær, and J. J. Pestka, “Lactobacilli differentially modulate expression of cytokines and maturation surface markers in murine dendritic cells,” The Journal of Immunology, vol. 168, no. 1, pp. 171–178, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. P. López, M. Gueimonde, A. Margolles, and A. Suárez, “Distinct Bifidobacterium strains drive different immune responses in vitro,” International Journal of Food Microbiology, vol. 138, no. 1-2, pp. 157–165, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. A. Swidsinski, V. Loening-Baucke, H. Lochs, and L. P. Hale, “Spatial organization of bacterial flora in normal and inflamed intestine: a fluorescence in situ hybridization study in mice,” World Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 11, no. 8, pp. 1131–1140, 2005. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. P. Brandtzaeg, “The gut as communicator between environment and host: Immunological consequences,” European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 668, supplement 1, pp. S16–S32, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. S. Arboleya, P. Ruas-Madiedo, A. Margolles et al., “Characterization and in vitro properties of potentially probiotic Bifidobacterium strains isolated from breast-milk,” International Journal of Food Microbiology, vol. 149, no. 1, pp. 28–36, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. P. López, I. González-Rodríguez, M. Gueimonde, A. Margolles, and A. Suárez, “Immune response to Bifidobacterium bifidum strains support Treg/Th17 plasticity,” PLoS ONE, vol. 6, no. 9, Article ID e24776, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. P. López, I. González-Rodríguez, B. Sánchez et al., “Interaction of Bifidobacterium bifidum LMG13195 with HT29 Cells Influences regulatory-T-cell-associated chemokine receptor expression,” Applied and Environmental Microbiology, vol. 78, no. 8, pp. 2850–2857, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. D. R. Mack, S. Ahrne, L. Hyde, S. Wei, and M. A. Hollingsworth, “Extracellular MUC3 mucin secretion follows adherence of Lactobacillus strains to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro,” Gut, vol. 52, no. 6, pp. 827–833, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. M. Schlee, J. Harder, B. Köten, E. F. Stange, J. Wehkamp, and K. Fellermann, “Probiotic lactobacilli and VSL#3 induce enterocyte β-defensin 2,” Clinical and Experimental Immunology, vol. 151, no. 3, pp. 528–535, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. R. Paolillo, C. R. Carratelli, S. Sorrentino, N. Mazzola, and A. Rizzo, “Immunomodulatory effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on human colon cancer cells,” International Immunopharmacology, vol. 9, no. 11, pp. 1265–1271, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. S. di Caro, H. Tao, A. Grillo et al., “Effects of Lactobacillus GG on genes expression pattern in small bowel mucosa,” Digestive and Liver Disease, vol. 37, no. 5, pp. 320–329, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. F. J. Troost, P. Van Baarlen, P. Lindsey et al., “Identification of the transcriptional response of human intestinal mucosa to Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 in vivo,” BMC Genomics, vol. 9, article 374, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. P. Van Baarlen, F. Troost, C. van der Meer et al., “Human mucosal in vivo transcriptome responses to three lactobacilli indicate how probiotics may modulate human cellular pathways,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 108, no. 1, pp. 4562–4569, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. C. U. Riedel, F. Foata, D. R. Goldstein, S. Blum, and B. J. Eikmanns, “Interaction of bifidobacteria with Caco-2 cells-adhesion and impact on expression profiles,” International Journal of Food Microbiology, vol. 110, no. 1, pp. 62–68, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. T. Shima, K. Fukushima, H. Setoyama et al., “Differential effects of two probiotic strains with different bacteriological properties on intestinal gene expression, with special reference to indigenous bacteria,” FEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology, vol. 52, no. 1, pp. 69–77, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. J.-G. Lan, S. M. Cruickshank, J. C. I. Singh et al., “Different cytokine response of primary colonic epithelial cells to commensal bacteria,” World Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 11, no. 22, pp. 3375–3384, 2005. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. J. H. Niess and H. C. Reinecker, “Chemokines in immune surveillance of the intestine,” Current Topics in Membranes, vol. 55, pp. 143–158, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. A. Cebula, M. Seweryn, G. A. Rempala et al., “Thymus-derived regulatory T cells contribute to tolerance to commensal microbiota,” Nature, vol. 497, no. 7448, pp. 258–262, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. A. Wuyts, S. Struyf, K. Gijsbers et al., “The CXC chemokine GCP-2/CXCL6 is predominantly induced in mesenchymal cells by interleukin-1β and is down-regulated by interferon-γ: comparison with interleukin-8/CXCL8,” Laboratory Investigation, vol. 83, no. 1, pp. 23–34, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. T. Olszak, D. An, S. Zeissig et al., “Microbial exposure during early life has persistent effects on natural killer T cell function,” Science, vol. 336, no. 6080, pp. 489–493, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. A. Sahu and J. D. Lambris, “Structure and biology of complement protein C3, a connecting link between innate and acquired immunity,” Immunological Reviews, vol. 180, pp. 35–48, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. M. R. Stone, A. O'Neill, D. Catino, and R. J. Bloch, “Specific interaction of the actin-binding domain of dystrophin with intermediate filaments containing keratin 19,” Molecular Biology of the Cell, vol. 16, no. 9, pp. 4280–4293, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. P. A. Wearsch and P. Cresswell, “In vitro reconstitution of the MHC class I peptide-loading complex,” Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 960, pp. 67–79, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  30. P. A. Wearsch and P. Cresswell, “Selective loading of high-affinity peptides onto major histocompatibility complex class I molecules by the tapasin-ERp57 heterodimer,” Nature Immunology, vol. 8, no. 8, pp. 873–881, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. R. Kaneno, G. V. Shurin, F. M. Kaneno, H. Naiditch, J. Luo, and M. R. Shurin, “Chemotherapeutic agents in low noncytotoxic concentrations increase immunogenicity of human colon cancer cells,” Cellular Oncology, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 97–106, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus