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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 479798, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/479798
Research Article

The Mechanism of Melanocytes-Specific Cytotoxicity Induced by Phenol Compounds Having a Prooxidant Effect, relating to the Appearance of Leukoderma

1Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, 2-10 Kawadacho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0054, Japan
2I.T.O. Co. Ltd., 1-6-7-3F Naka-cho, Musashino, Tokyo 180-0006, Japan
3Faculty of Pharmacy, Keio University, 1-5-30 Shibakoen, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8512, Japan
4School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo University of Technology, 1404-1 Katakuramachi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0982, Japan

Received 25 August 2014; Accepted 1 March 2015

Academic Editor: Davinder Parsad

Copyright © 2015 Takeshi Nagata et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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