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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 487372, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/487372
Research Article

The Relevance of Interoception in Chronic Tinnitus: Analyzing Interoceptive Sensibility and Accuracy

1Institute for Biomagnetism and Biosignalanalysis, University Hospital of Münster, Malmedyweg 15, 48149 Münster, Germany
2Institute of Psychology, University of Münster, Fliednerstraße 21, 48149 Münster, Germany
3Institute for Physiological Psychology, University of Bielefeld, Universitätsstraße 25, 33615 Bielefeld, Germany
4Institute of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Cologne, Pohligstraße 1, 50969 Cologne, Germany
5Department of Psychology, LMU Munich, Leopoldstraße 13, 80802 Munich, Germany

Received 17 April 2015; Accepted 22 July 2015

Academic Editor: Aage R. Møller

Copyright © 2015 Pia Lau et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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