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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 498957, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/498957
Review Article

The Interplay between Synaptic Activity and Neuroligin Function in the CNS

Department of Neurobiology, Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of Ministry of Health, Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058, China

Received 11 December 2014; Revised 12 February 2015; Accepted 23 February 2015

Academic Editor: Yeon-Kyun Shin

Copyright © 2015 Xiaoge Hu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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