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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 504187, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/504187
Research Article

Sialic Acid Expression in the Mosquito Aedes aegypti and Its Possible Role in Dengue Virus-Vector Interactions

1Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Department, Biomedical Research Institute, National University of México (UNAM), 04510 México City, Mexico
2Structural and Functional Glycobiology Unit, UMR 8576 CNRS, University of Sciences and Technologies of Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq, France
3Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Medicine, UNAM, 04510 México City, Mexico
4CISEI, National Institute of Public Health, 62100 Cuernavaca, MOR, Mexico
5Infectomics and Molecular Pathogenesis Department, CINVESTAV-IPN, 07360 México City, Mexico
6Virology Department, National Respiratory Institute (INER), 14050 México City, Mexico

Received 25 July 2014; Accepted 24 September 2014

Academic Editor: Michael J. Conway

Copyright © 2015 Jorge Cime-Castillo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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