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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 539238, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/539238
Review Article

Functional Importance of Mobile Ribosomal Proteins

1Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan
2Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan

Received 26 June 2015; Accepted 12 August 2015

Academic Editor: Ali A. Khraibi

Copyright © 2015 Kai-Chun Chang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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