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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 542467, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/542467
Review Article

A Window into the Brain: Advances in Psychiatric fMRI

1School of Psychology and Center for Studies of Psychological Application, South China Normal University, 55 West Zhongshan Avenue, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510631, China
2School of Economics & Management and Scientific Laboratory of Economic Behaviors, South China Normal University, 55 West Zhongshan Avenue, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510631, China

Received 23 August 2014; Revised 16 December 2014; Accepted 17 December 2014

Academic Editor: Zhengchao Dong

Copyright © 2015 Xiaoyan Zhan and Rongjun Yu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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