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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 548930, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/548930
Research Article

Impact of Moderate Heat, Carvacrol, and Thymol Treatments on the Viability, Injury, and Stress Response of Listeria monocytogenes

1Departamento de Ingeniería de Alimentos y del Equipamiento Agrícola, Campus de Excelencia Internacional Regional “Campus Mare Nostrum”, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería Agronómica, Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, Paseo Alfonso XIII 48, Cartagena, 30203 Murcia, Spain
2Instituto de Biotecnología Vegetal, Campus de Excelencia Internacional Regional “Campus Mare Nostrum”, Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, Edificio I+D+I, Muralla del Mar, Cartagena, 30202 Murcia, Spain

Received 22 April 2015; Accepted 11 June 2015

Academic Editor: Avelino Alvarez-Ordóñez

Copyright © 2015 L. Guevara et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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