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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 574186, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/574186
Review Article

Is There a Persistent Dysfunction of Neurovascular Coupling in Migraine?

1Institute of Physiology, Medical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Zaloška Cesta 4, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
2Department of Vascular Neurology, University Clinical Centre, Zaloška Cesta 2, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia

Received 3 September 2014; Accepted 2 December 2014

Academic Editor: Gianluca Coppola

Copyright © 2015 Andrej Fabjan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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