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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 593572, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/593572
Research Article

Transcriptomic and Immunohistochemical Profiling of SLC6A14 in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

1Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
3Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
4Medical Genome Facility, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
5Department of Epidemiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
6Department of Anatomic Pathology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
7Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
8Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA

Received 19 December 2014; Accepted 24 April 2015

Academic Editor: Ernesto Picardi

Copyright © 2015 Alan R. Penheiter et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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