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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 608682, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/608682
Research Article

Expression of the Genes Encoding the Trk and Kdp Potassium Transport Systems of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Growth In Vitro

1Department of Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0001, South Africa
2Department of Genetics, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0001, South Africa

Received 19 May 2015; Revised 30 July 2015; Accepted 2 August 2015

Academic Editor: Bo Zuo

Copyright © 2015 Moloko C. Cholo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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