Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 615865, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/615865
Research Article

The Macrophage Galactose-Type Lectin-1 (MGL1) Recognizes Taenia crassiceps Antigens, Triggers Intracellular Signaling, and Is Critical for Resistance to This Infection

1Unidad de Biomedicina, Facultad de Estudios Superiores-Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Avenue de los Barrios 1, Los Reyes Iztacala, 54090 Tlalnepantla, MEX, Mexico
2Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA
3Sección de Estudios de Postgrado e Investigación, Escuela Superior de Medicina, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Mexico
4Proyecto CyMA, UIICSE, FES Iztacala, UNAM, 54090 Tlalnepantla, MEX, Mexico
5Instituto Nacional de Cardiología “Ignacio Chávez,” 14080 Mexico, DF, Mexico

Received 9 August 2014; Revised 14 October 2014; Accepted 15 October 2014

Academic Editor: Abraham Landa

Copyright © 2015 Daniel Montero-Barrera et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

C-type lectins are multifunctional sugar-binding molecules expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages that internalize antigens for processing and presentation. Macrophage galactose-type lectin 1 (MGL1) recognizes glycoconjugates expressing Lewis X structures which contain galactose residues, and it is selectively expressed on immature DCs and macrophages. Helminth parasites contain large amounts of glycosylated components, which play a role in the immune regulation induced by such infections. Macrophages from MGL1−/− mice showed less binding ability toward parasite antigens than their wild-type (WT) counterparts. Exposure of WT macrophages to T. crassiceps antigens triggered tyrosine phosphorylation signaling activity, which was diminished in MGL1−/− macrophages. Following T. crassiceps infection, MGL1−/− mice failed to produce significant levels of inflammatory cytokines early in the infection compared to WT mice. In contrast, MGL1−/− mice developed a Th2-dominant immune response that was associated with significantly higher parasite loads, whereas WT mice were resistant. Flow cytometry and RT-PCR analyses showed overexpression of the mannose receptors, IL-4Rα, PDL2, arginase-1, Ym1, and RELM-α on MGL1−/− macrophages. These studies indicate that MGL1 is involved in T. crassiceps recognition and subsequent innate immune activation and resistance.