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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 629587, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/629587
Research Article

Single-Fraction Radiotherapy for CD30+ Lymphoproliferative Disorders

1Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA
2Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA
3Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University, Chicago, IL 60153, USA
4Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA

Received 22 June 2015; Accepted 31 August 2015

Academic Editor: Emmanuella Guenova

Copyright © 2015 Michelle S. Gentile et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objectives. CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorder is a rare variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Sustained complete response following first-line treatments is rare. This retrospective review evaluates the response of refractory or recurrent lesions to palliative radiation therapy. Methods. The records of 6 patients with 12 lesions, treated with radiation therapy, were reviewed. All patients received previous first-line treatments. Patients with clinical and pathological evidence of symptomatic CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorder, with no history of other cutaneous T-cell lymphoma variants, and with no prior radiation therapy to the index site were included. Results. The median age of patients was 50.5 years (range, 15–83 years). Median size of the treated lesions was 2.5 cm (range, 2–7 cm). Four sites were treated with a single fraction of 750–800 cGy () and 8 sites were treated with 4000–4500 cGy in 200–250 cGy fractions (). Radiation therapy was administered with electrons and bolus. Median follow-up was 113 months (range, 16–147 months). For all sites, there was 100% complete response with acute grade 1-2 dermatitis. Conclusions. For recurrent and symptomatic radiation-naïve CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorder lesions, palliative radiation therapy shows excellent response. A single fraction of 750–800 cGy is as effective as a multifractionated course and more convenient.