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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 634865, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/634865
Review Article

Breast Cancer-Derived Extracellular Vesicles: Characterization and Contribution to the Metastatic Phenotype

1Comprehensive Community Cancer Center, Roseman University College of Medicine, Las Vegas, NV 89135, USA
2Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA

Received 18 April 2015; Revised 24 September 2015; Accepted 4 October 2015

Academic Editor: Anelli Tiziana

Copyright © 2015 Toni M. Green et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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