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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 641958, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/641958
Research Article

Can Early Rehabilitation after Total Hip Arthroplasty Reduce Its Major Complications and Medical Expenses? Report from a Nationally Representative Cohort

1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan
2Department of Business Management, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan
3Department of Medical Research, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan
4Division of Urogynecology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan
5Department of Recreation and Health-Care Management and Institute of Recreation Industry Management, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Taiwan

Received 20 March 2015; Accepted 24 May 2015

Academic Editor: Radovan Zdero

Copyright © 2015 Daniel Chiung-Jui Su et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. To investigate whether early rehabilitation reduces the occurrence of posttotal hip arthroplasty (THA) complications, adverse events, and medical expenses within one postoperative year. Method. We retrospectively retrieve data from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients who had undergone THA during the period from 1998 to 2010 were recruited, matched for propensity scores, and divided into 2 groups: early rehabilitation (Early Rehab) and delayed rehabilitation (Delayed Rehab). Results. Eight hundred twenty of 999 THA patients given early rehabilitation treatments were matched to 205 of 233 THA patients given delayed rehabilitation treatments. The Delayed Rehab group had significantly (all ) higher medical and rehabilitation expenses and more outpatient department (OPD) visits than the Early Rehab group. In addition, the Delayed Rehab group was associated with more prosthetic infection (odds ratio (OR): 3.152; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.211–8.203; ) than the Early Rehab group. Conclusions. Early rehabilitation can significantly reduce the incidence of prosthetic infection, total rehabilitation expense, total medical expenses, and number of OPD visits within the first year after THA.