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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 654806, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/654806
Research Article

Chewing Gum: Cognitive Performance, Mood, Well-Being, and Associated Physiology

1Laboratory of Neurogastroenterology, Department of Psychiatry/Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Biosciences Institute, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
2Centre for Occupational and Health Psychology, School of Psychology, Cardiff University, 63 Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3AS, UK

Received 17 September 2014; Revised 26 January 2015; Accepted 29 January 2015

Academic Editor: Kin-ya Kubo

Copyright © 2015 Andrew P. Allen and Andrew P. Smith. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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