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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 672784, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/672784
Review Article

Using Sibling Designs to Understand Neurodevelopmental Disorders: From Genes and Environments to Prevention Programming

1Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development, University of Toronto, 252 Bloor Street W., Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 1V6
2Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 1N4

Received 12 March 2015; Revised 5 June 2015; Accepted 28 June 2015

Academic Editor: Ping I. Lin

Copyright © 2015 Mark Wade et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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