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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 684084, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/684084
Review Article

The Use of Stem Cells in Burn Wound Healing: A Review

1Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
2Department of Anatomy and Regenerative Biology, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA
3Department of Surgery, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
4Lebanese Health Society, Beirut, Lebanon
5Department of Anatomy, Cell Biology, and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
6Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

Received 3 November 2014; Revised 21 January 2015; Accepted 22 January 2015

Academic Editor: Cornelia Kasper

Copyright © 2015 Fadi Ghieh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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