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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 684242, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/684242
Research Article

Advanced Glycation End Products Induce Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition via Downregulating Sirt 1 and Upregulating TGF-β in Human Endothelial Cells

Pacing Electrophysiology Division, First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, No. 137, Liyushan South Road, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830054, China

Received 21 September 2014; Accepted 25 November 2014

Academic Editor: Beatrice Charreau

Copyright © 2015 Wei He et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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