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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 698795, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/698795
Review Article

Bisphenol A Effects on Mammalian Oogenesis and Epigenetic Integrity of Oocytes: A Case Study Exploring Risks of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals

1Faculty of Biology, Gene Technology/Microbiology, University of Bielefeld, 33601 Bielefeld, Germany
2Laboratory of Toxicology, Unit of Radiation Biology and Human Health, ENEA CR Casaccia, 00123 Santa Maria di Galeria, Rome, Italy

Received 16 January 2015; Revised 5 May 2015; Accepted 5 May 2015

Academic Editor: Dong-Wook Han

Copyright © 2015 Ursula Eichenlaub-Ritter and Francesca Pacchierotti. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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