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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 707891, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/707891
Research Article

Using Electronic Health Records to Support Clinical Trials: A Report on Stakeholder Engagement for EHR4CR

1Robertson Centre for Biostatistics, Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK
2Department of Internal Medicine, Hypertension and Vascular Diseases, The Medical University of Warsaw, Central Teaching Hospital SP CSK, 1A Banacha Street, 02 097 Warsaw, Poland
3The European Institute for Health Records (EuroRec), 9830 Sint-Martens-Latem, Belgium
4UTOPIAN, University of Toronto, North York General Hospital, 4001 Leslie Street, Room GS-70, Toronto, ON M2K 1E1, Canada
5Department of Medical Informatics, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91058 Erlangen, Germany
6Institute of Medical Informatics, University of Münster, 48149 Münster, Germany

Received 19 January 2015; Accepted 29 June 2015

Academic Editor: Francesco Di Raimondo

Copyright © 2015 Colin McCowan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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