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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 714197, 25 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/714197
Review Article

The Sarcomeric M-Region: A Molecular Command Center for Diverse Cellular Processes

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, 108 N Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA

Received 17 November 2014; Accepted 8 February 2015

Academic Editor: Oleg S. Matusovsky

Copyright © 2015 Li-Yen R. Hu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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