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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 732450, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/732450
Research Article

Advanced Glycation End Products Enhance Macrophages Polarization into M1 Phenotype through Activating RAGE/NF-κB Pathway

1Department of Cardiology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, 1665 Kongjiang Road, Shanghai 200092, China
2Department of Cardiology, Central Hospital of Minhang District, 170 Xinsong Road, Shanghai 201199, China
3Department of Cardiology, Zhongda Hospital Affiliated to Southeast University, 89 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing 210009, China

Received 18 March 2015; Accepted 12 May 2015

Academic Editor: Patrizia Rovere-Querini

Copyright © 2015 Xian Jin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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