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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 738147, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/738147
Research Article

The Effect of Walterinnesia aegyptia Venom Proteins on TCA Cycle Activity and Mitochondrial NAD+-Redox State in Cultured Human Fibroblasts

1Medical and Molecular Genetics Research Chair, Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, P.O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11433, Saudi Arabia
2The Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, Giza 12613, Egypt

Received 5 July 2014; Revised 27 October 2014; Accepted 28 October 2014

Academic Editor: Michele Rechia Fighera

Copyright © 2015 Hazem K. Ghneim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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