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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 758616, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/758616
Research Article

Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Atherosclerosis Using CD81-Targeted Microparticles of Iron Oxide in Mice

1The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510500, China
2Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055, China
3Shenzhen Key Laboratory for Molecular Imaging, Shenzhen 518055, China
4Department of Physics, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA

Received 24 March 2015; Revised 23 June 2015; Accepted 25 June 2015

Academic Editor: Kazuma Ogawa

Copyright © 2015 Fei Yan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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