Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 810124, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/810124
Research Article

Response of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi to Hydrologic Gradients in the Rhizosphere of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin ex. Steudel Growing in the Sun Island Wetland

State Key Lab of Urban Water Resource and Environment, School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090, China

Received 29 September 2014; Accepted 6 January 2015

Academic Editor: Guo-Jun Xie

Copyright © 2015 Li Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. N. Dolinar and A. Gaberščik, “Mycorrhizal colonization and growth of Phragmites australis in an intermittent wetland,” Aquatic Botany, vol. 93, no. 2, pp. 93–98, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. D. Redecker and P. Raab, “Phylogeny of the Glomeromycota (arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi): recent developments and new gene markers,” Mycologia, vol. 98, no. 6, pp. 885–895, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. X.-L. Li, E. George, and H. Marschner, “Phosphorus depletion and pH decrease at the root-soil and hyphae- soil interfaces of VA mycorrhizal white clover fertilized with ammonium,” New Phytologist, vol. 119, no. 3, pp. 397–404, 1991. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. L. Lioussanne, F. Perreault, M. Jolicoeur, and M. St-Arnaud, “The bacterial community of tomato rhizosphere is modified by inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi but unaffected by soil enrichment with mycorrhizal root exudates or inoculation with Phytophthora nicotianae,” Soil Biology and Biochemistry, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 473–483, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. K. H. Söderberg, P. A. Olsson, and E. Bååth, “Structure and activity of the bacterial community in the rhizosphere of different plant species and the effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonisation,” FEMS Microbiology Ecology, vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 223–231, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. R. M. Dunham, A. M. Ray, and R. S. Inouye, “Growth, physiology, and chemistry of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal Typha latifolia seedlings,” Wetlands, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 890–896, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. E. J. Joner, A. Johansen, A. P. Loibner et al., “Rhizosphere effects on microbial community structure and dissipation and toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in spiked soil,” Environmental Science and Technology, vol. 35, no. 13, pp. 2773–2777, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. R. T. Koide and B. Mosse, “A history of research on arbuscular mycorrhiza,” Mycorrhiza, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 145–163, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. M. Miransari, H. A. Bahrami, F. Rejali, and M. J. Malakouti, “Effects of soil compaction and arbuscular mycorrhiza on corn (Zea mays L.) nutrient uptake,” Soil and Tillage Research, vol. 103, no. 2, pp. 282–290, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. H. Marschner and B. Dell, “Nutrient uptake in mycorrhizal symbiosis,” Plant and Soil, vol. 159, no. 1, pp. 89–102, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. B. E. Wolfe, D. L. Mummey, M. C. Rillig, and J. N. Klironomos, “Small-scale spatial heterogeneity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal abundance and community composition in a wetland plant community,” Mycorrhiza, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 175–183, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. H. Evelin, R. Kapoor, and B. Giri, “Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in alleviation of salt stress: a review,” Annals of Botany, vol. 104, no. 7, pp. 1263–1280, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. S. E. Smith, E. Facelli, S. Pope, and F. A. Smith, “Plant performance in stressful environments: interpreting new and established knowledge of the roles of arbuscular mycorrhizas,” Plant and Soil, vol. 326, no. 1, pp. 3–20, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. K. J. Stevens and R. L. Peterson, “Relationships among three pathways for resource acquisition and their contribution to plant performance in the emergent aquatic plant Lythrum salicaria (L.),” Plant Biology, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 758–765, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. K. J. Stevens, C. B. Wall, and J. A. Janssen, “Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on seedling growth and development of two wetland plants, Bidens frondosa L., and Eclipta prostrata (L.) L., grown under three levels of water availability,” Mycorrhiza, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 279–288, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. D. Kandalepas, K. J. Stevens, G. P. Shaffer, and W. J. Platt, “How abundant are root-colonizing fungi in Southeastern Louisiana's degraded marshes?” Wetlands, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 189–199, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. K. J. Stevens, M. R. Wellner, and M. F. Acevedo, “Dark septate endophyte and arbuscular mycorrhizal status of vegetation colonizing a bottomland hardwood forest after a 100 year flood,” Aquatic Botany, vol. 92, no. 2, pp. 105–111, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. A. M. Hirsch and Y. Kapulnik, “Signal transduction pathways in mycorrhizal associations: comparisons with the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis,” Fungal Genetics and Biology, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 205–212, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. T. Wubet, I. Kottke, D. Teketay, and F. Oberwinkler, “Mycorrhizal status of indigenous trees in dry Afromontane forests of Ethiopia,” Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 179, no. 1–3, pp. 387–399, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. A. Mauchamp and M. Méthy, “Submergence-induced damage of photosynthetic apparatus in Phragmites australis,” Environmental and Experimental Botany, vol. 51, no. 3, pp. 227–235, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. C. Hudon, P. Gagnon, and M. Jean, “Hydrological factors controlling the spread of common reed (Phragmites australis) in the St. Lawrence River (Québec, Canada),” Ecoscience, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 347–357, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. A. I. Engloner and M. Papp, “Vertical differences in Phragmites australis culm anatomy along a water depth gradient,” Aquatic Botany, vol. 85, no. 2, pp. 137–146, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. H. Brix, B. K. Sorrell, and H. H. Schierup, “Gas fluxes achieved by in situ convective flow in Phragmites australis,” Aquatic Botany, vol. 54, no. 2-3, pp. 151–163, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. S. G. R. Wirsel, “Homogenous stands of a wetland grass harbour diverse consortia of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi,” FEMS Microbiology Ecology, vol. 48, no. 2, pp. 129–138, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. J. Wu, L. Wang, F. Ma, J. Yang, S. Li, and Z. Li, “Effects of vegetative-periodic-induced rhizosphere variation on the uptake and translocation of metals in Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin ex. Steudel growing in the Sun Island Wetland,” Ecotoxicology, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 608–618, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. E. Kandeler, “Organic matter by wet combustion,” in Methods in Soil Biology, F. Schinner, R. Öhlinger, E. Kandeler, and R. Margesin, Eds., pp. 397–398, Springer, Berlin, Germany, 1st edition, 1995. View at Google Scholar
  27. E. Gomez, L. Ferreras, and S. Toresani, “Soil bacterial functional diversity as influenced by organic amendment application,” Bioresource Technology, vol. 97, no. 13, pp. 1484–1489, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. A. T. Classen, S. I. Boyle, K. E. Haskins, S. T. Overby, and S. C. Hart, “Community-level physiological profiles of bacteria and fungi: plate type and incubation temperature influences on contrasting soils,” FEMS Microbiology Ecology, vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 319–328, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. A. M. Derry, W. J. Staddon, P. G. Kevan, and J. T. Trevors, “Functional diversity and community structure of micro-organisms in three arctic soils as determined by sole-carbon-source-utilization,” Biodiversity & Conservation, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 205–221, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. J. L. Garland, “Analysis and interpretation of community-level physiological profiles in microbial ecology,” FEMS Microbiology Ecology, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 289–300, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. S. A. Huws, J. E. Edwards, E. J. Kim, and N. D. Scollan, “Specificity and sensitivity of eubacterial primers utilized for molecular profiling of bacteria within complex microbial ecosystems,” Journal of Microbiological Methods, vol. 70, no. 3, pp. 565–569, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. G. Muyzer, E. C. De Waal, and A. G. Uitterlinden, “Profiling of complex microbial populations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified genes coding for 16S rRNA,” Applied and Environmental Microbiology, vol. 59, no. 3, pp. 695–700, 1993. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. E. J. Vainio and J. Hantula, “Direct analysis of wood-inhabiting fungi using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of amplified ribosomal DNA,” Mycological Research, vol. 104, no. 8, pp. 927–936, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. Y.-H. Yang, J. Yao, S. Hu, and Y. Qi, “Effects of agricultural chemicals on DNA sequence diversity of soil microbial community: a study with RAPD marker,” Microbial Ecology, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 72–79, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. L.-F. Li, Y. Zhang, and Z.-W. Zhao, “Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization and spore density across different land-use types in a hot and arid ecosystem, Southwest China,” Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, vol. 170, no. 3, pp. 419–425, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. T. P. McGonigle, M. H. Miller, D. G. Evans, G. L. Fairchild, and J. A. Swan, “A new method which gives an objective measure of colonization of roots by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi,” New Phytologist, vol. 115, no. 3, pp. 495–501, 1990. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. N. Šraj-Kržič, P. Pongrac, M. Klemenc, A. Kladnik, M. Regvar, and A. Gaberščik, “Mycorrhizal colonisation in plants from intermittent aquatic habitats,” Aquatic Botany, vol. 85, no. 4, pp. 331–336, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. A. M. Ray and R. S. Inouye, “Effects of water-level fluctuations on the arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of Typha latifolia L,” Aquatic Botany, vol. 84, no. 3, pp. 210–216, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. M. Ijdo, N. Schtickzelle, S. Cranenbrouck, and S. Declerck, “Do arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi with contrasting life-history strategies differ in their responses to repeated defoliation?” FEMS Microbiology Ecology, vol. 72, no. 1, pp. 114–122, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. K. E. Bohrer, C. F. Friese, and J. P. Amon, “Seasonal dynamics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in differing wetland habitats,” Mycorrhiza, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 329–337, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. S. P. Miller and R. R. Sharitz, “Manipulation of flooding and arbuscular mycorrhiza formation influences growth and nutrition of two semiaquatic grass species,” Functional Ecology, vol. 14, no. 6, pp. 738–748, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. T. V. St. John, D. C. Coleman, and C. P. P. Reid, “Association of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal hyphae with soil organic particles,” Ecology, vol. 64, no. 4, pp. 957–959, 1983. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  43. M. E. Gavito and P. A. Olsson, “Allocation of plant carbon to foraging and storage in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi,” FEMS Microbiology Ecology, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 181–187, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. S. Ravnskov, J. Larsen, P. A. Olsson, and I. Jakobsen, “Effects of various organic compounds on growth and phosphorus uptake of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus,” New Phytologist, vol. 141, no. 3, pp. 517–524, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. R. C. Anderson, A. E. Liberta, and L. A. Dickman, “Interaction of vascular plants and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi across a soil moisture-nutrient gradient,” Oecologia, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. 111–117, 1984. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. M. Landwehr, U. Hildebrandt, P. Wilde et al., “The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus geosporum in European saline, sodic and gypsum soils,” Mycorrhiza, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 199–211, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. F. Laheurte, C. Leyval, and J. Berthelin, “Root exudates of maize, pine and beech seedlings influenced by mycorrhizal and bacterial inoculation,” Symbiosis, vol. 9, pp. 111–116, 1990. View at Google Scholar
  48. P. Garbeva, J. D. van Elsas, and J. A. van Veen, “Rhizosphere microbial community and its response to plant species and soil history,” Plant and Soil, vol. 302, no. 1-2, pp. 19–32, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. V. Artursson, R. D. Finlay, and J. K. Jansson, “Combined bromodeoxyuridine immunocapture and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis highlights differences in the active soil bacterial metagenome due to Glomus mosseae inoculation or plant species,” Environmental Microbiology, vol. 7, no. 12, pp. 1952–1966, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. J. F. Toljander, B. D. Lindahl, L. R. Paul, M. Elfstrand, and R. D. Finlay, “Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal mycelial exudates on soil bacterial growth and community structure,” FEMS Microbiology Ecology, vol. 61, no. 2, pp. 295–304, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  51. M. Filion, M. St-Arnaud, and J. A. Fortin, “Direct interaction between the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices and different rhizosphere microorganisms,” New Phytologist, vol. 141, no. 3, pp. 525–533, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  52. E. Gamalero, A. Trotta, N. Massa, A. Copetta, M. G. Martinotti, and G. Berta, “Impact of two fluorescent pseudomonads and an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus on tomato plant growth, root architecture and P acquisition,” Mycorrhiza, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 185–192, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  53. A. Marulanda-Aguirre, R. Azcón, J. M. Ruiz-Lozano, and R. Aroca, “Differential effects of a Bacillus megaterium strain on Lactuca sativa plant growth depending on the origin of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus coinoculated: physiologic and biochemical traits,” Journal of Plant Growth Regulation, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 10–18, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  54. P. Bonfante and I.-A. Anca, “Plants, mycorrhizal fungi, and bacteria: a network of interactions,” Annual Review of Microbiology, vol. 63, pp. 363–383, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  55. M. Bonkowski, C. Villenave, and B. Griffiths, “Rhizosphere fauna: the functional and structural diversity of intimate interactions of soil fauna with plant roots,” Plant and Soil, vol. 321, no. 1-2, pp. 213–233, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  56. M. Miransari, “Interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and soil bacteria,” Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, vol. 89, no. 4, pp. 917–930, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  57. S. Purin and M. C. Rillig, “Parasitism of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: reviewing the evidence,” FEMS Microbiology Letters, vol. 279, no. 1, pp. 8–14, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  58. C. Wamberg, S. Christensen, I. Jakobsen, A. K. Müller, and S. J. Sørensen, “The mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus intraradices) affects microbial activity in the rhizosphere of pea plants (Pisum sativum),” Soil Biology and Biochemistry, vol. 35, no. 10, pp. 1349–1357, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  59. R. L. Gadgil and P. D. Gadgil, “Mycorrhiza and litter decomposition,” Nature, vol. 233, no. 5315, p. 133, 1971. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  60. J. Leigh, A. H. Fitter, and A. Hodge, “Growth and symbiotic effectiveness of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus in organic matter in competition with soil bacteria,” FEMS Microbiology Ecology, vol. 76, no. 3, pp. 428–438, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  61. N. de Jaeger, S. Declerck, and I. E. de la Providencia, “Mycoparasitism of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: a pathway for the entry of saprotrophic fungi into roots,” FEMS Microbiology Ecology, vol. 73, no. 2, pp. 312–322, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  62. J. F. Johansson, L. R. Paul, and R. D. Finlay, “Microbial interactions in the mycorrhizosphere and their significance for sustainable agriculture,” FEMS Microbiology Ecology, vol. 48, no. 1, pp. 1–13, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  63. E. Paterson, “Importance of rhizodeposition in the coupling of plant and microbial productivity,” European Journal of Soil Science, vol. 54, no. 4, pp. 741–750, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  64. L. J. C. Xavier and J. J. Germida, “Bacteria associated with Glomus clarum spores influence mycorrhizal activity,” Soil Biology & Biochemistry, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 471–478, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  65. M. Søndergaard and S. Laegaard, “Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza in some aquatic vascular plants,” Nature, vol. 268, no. 5617, pp. 232–233, 1977. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  66. A. Hodge, C. D. Campbell, and A. H. Fitter, “An arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus accelerates decomposition and acquires nitrogen directly from organic material,” Nature, vol. 413, no. 6853, pp. 297–299, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  67. J. Leigh, A. Hodge, and A. H. Fitter, “Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi can transfer substantial amounts of nitrogen to their host plant from organic material,” New Phytologist, vol. 181, no. 1, pp. 199–207, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  68. H. H. Zhu, L. K. Long, S. Z. Yang, and Q. Yao, “Influence of AM fungus on Ralstonia solanacearum population and bacterial community structure in rhizosphere,” Mycosystema, vol. 24, pp. 137–142, 2005 (Chinese). View at Google Scholar
  69. F. Ø. Andersen and T. Andersen, “Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizae on biomass and nutrients in the aquatic plant Littorella uniflora,” Freshwater Biology, vol. 51, no. 9, pp. 1623–1633, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  70. K. Jayachandran and K. G. Shetty, “Growth response and phosphorus uptake by arbuscular mycorrhizae of wet prairie sawgrass,” Aquatic Botany, vol. 76, no. 4, pp. 281–290, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  71. I. R. Sanders and A. H. Fitter, “The ecology and functioning of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizas in co-existing grassland species. II. Nutrient uptake and growth of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal plants in a semi-natural grassland,” New Phytologist, vol. 120, no. 4, pp. 525–533, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus