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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 821827, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/821827
Research Article

Association between ANKK1 (rs1800497) and LTA (rs909253) Genetic Variants and Risk of Schizophrenia

1Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80200, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia
2Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Umm Al-Qura University, P.O. Box 57543, Mecca 21955, Saudi Arabia
3Department of Molecular Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566, Egypt

Received 9 February 2015; Accepted 18 May 2015

Academic Editor: Margaret A. Niznikiewicz

Copyright © 2015 Arwa H. Arab and Nasser A. Elhawary. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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