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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 854359, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/854359
Research Article

The Protective Effect of Melatonin on Neural Stem Cell against LPS-Induced Inflammation

1Department of Anatomy, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752, Republic of Korea
2BK21 Plus Project for Medical Sciences and Brain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752, Republic of Korea
3Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea

Received 10 August 2014; Revised 5 November 2014; Accepted 13 November 2014

Academic Editor: Janusz Blasiak

Copyright © 2015 Juhyun Song et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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