Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 857202, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/857202
Research Article

Overexpression of NTRK1 Promotes Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells into Cholinergic Neurons

1Department of Neurology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangdong Neuroscience Institute, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080, China
2Department of Neurology, Linyi City People’s Hospital, Linyi, Shandong 276000, China
3Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation, Department of Neurology, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510120, China

Received 9 July 2015; Revised 25 August 2015; Accepted 16 September 2015

Academic Editor: William Z. Suo

Copyright © 2015 Limin Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. E. J. Huang and L. F. Reichardt, “Trk receptors: roles in neuronal signal transduction,” Annual Review of Biochemistry, vol. 72, pp. 609–642, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. L. Harel, B. Costa, M. Tcherpakov et al., “CCM2 mediates death signaling by the TrkA receptor tyrosine kinase,” Neuron, vol. 63, no. 5, pp. 585–591, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. R. W. Alfa, M. H. Tuszynski, and A. Blesch, “A novel inducible tyrosine kinase receptor to regulate signal transduction and neurite outgrowth,” Journal of Neuroscience Research, vol. 87, no. 12, pp. 2624–2631, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. J. A. Luther and S. J. Birren, “Neurotrophins and target interactions in the development and regulation of sympathetic neuron electrical and synaptic properties,” Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical, vol. 151, no. 1, pp. 46–60, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. Y. Li, D. M. Holtzman, L. F. Kromer et al., “Regulation of TrkA and ChAT expression in developing rat basal forebrain: evidence that both exogenous and endogenous NGF regulate differentiation of cholinergic neurons,” Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 2888–2905, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. A. Tacconelli, A. R. Farina, L. Cappabianca, A. Gulino, and A. R. Mackay, “TrkAIII: a novel hypoxia-regulated alternative TrkA splice variant of potential physiological and pathological importance,” Cell Cycle, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 8–9, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. P. Dutta, A. Koch, B. Breyer et al., “Identification of novel target genes of nerve growth factor (NGF) in human mastocytoma cell line (HMC-1 (V560G c-Kit)) by transcriptome analysis,” BMC Genomics, vol. 12, article 196, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. V. Nikoletopoulou, H. Lickert, J. M. Frade et al., “Neurotrophin receptors TrkA and TrkC cause neuronal death whereas TrkB does not,” Nature, vol. 467, no. 7311, pp. 59–63, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. A. Lambiase, A. Micera, G. Pellegrini et al., “In vitro evidence of nerve growth factor effects on human conjunctival epithelial cell differentiation and mucin gene expression,” Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, vol. 50, no. 10, pp. 4622–4630, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. D. Sareen, M. Saghizadeh, L. Ornelas et al., “Differentiation of human limbal-derived induced pluripotent stem cells into limbal-like epithelium,” Stem Cells Translational Medicine, vol. 3, no. 9, pp. 1002–1012, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. M. V. Sofroniew, N. P. Galletly, O. Isacson, and C. N. Svendsen, “Survival of adult basal forebrain cholinergic neurons after loss of target neurons,” Science, vol. 247, no. 4940, pp. 338–342, 1990. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. K. Okada, K. Nishizawa, T. Kobayashi, S. Sakata, and K. Kobayashi, “Distinct roles of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in spatial and object recognition memory,” Scientific Reports, vol. 5, Article ID 13158, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  13. M. Mesulam, “The cholinergic lesion of Alzheimer's disease: pivotal factor or side show?” Learning and Memory, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 43–49, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. S. E. Counts and E. J. Mufson, “The role of nerve growth factor receptors in cholinergic basal forebrain degeneration in prodromal Alzheimer disease,” Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology, vol. 64, no. 4, pp. 263–272, 2005. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. A. Cozza, E. Melissari, P. Iacopetti et al., “SNPs in neurotrophin system genes and Alzheimer's disease in an Italian population,” Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 61–70, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. K. J. Park, C. A. Grosso, I. Aubert, D. R. Kaplan, and F. D. Miller, “P75NTR-dependent, myelin-mediated axonal degeneration regulates neural connectivity in the adult brain,” Nature Neuroscience, vol. 13, no. 5, pp. 559–566, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. O. M. E. Abdel-Salam, “Stem cell therapy for Alzheimer's disease,” CNS and Neurological Disorders—Drug Targets, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 459–485, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. C. J. Bissonnette, L. Lyass, B. J. Bhattacharyya, A. Belmadani, R. J. Miller, and J. A. Kessler, “The controlled generation of functional basal forebrain cholinergic neurons from human embryonic stem cells,” Stem Cells, vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 802–811, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. Y. Itou, R. Nochi, H. Kuribayashi, Y. Saito, and T. Hisatsune, “Cholinergic activation of hippocampal neural stem cells in aged dentate gyrus,” Hippocampus, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 446–459, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. X. Zhang, S.-Y. Wanda, K. Brenneman et al., “Improving Salmonella vector with rec mutation to stabilize the DNA cargoes,” BMC Microbiology, vol. 11, article 31, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. D. R. Kaplan, B. L. Hempstead, D. Martin-Zanca, M. V. Chao, and L. F. Parada, “The trk proto-oncogene product: a signal transducing receptor for nerve growth factor,” Science, vol. 252, no. 5005, pp. 554–558, 1991. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. R. Klein, S. Jing, V. Nanduri, E. O'Rourke, and M. Barbacid, “The trk proto-oncogene encodes a receptor for nerve growth factor,” Cell, vol. 65, no. 1, pp. 189–197, 1991. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. L. Ivanisevic, W. Zheng, S. B. Woo, K. E. Neet, and H. U. Saragovi, “TrkA receptor ‘hot spots’ for binding of NT-3 as a heterologous ligand,” The Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 282, no. 23, pp. 16754–16763, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. D. O. Clary and L. F. Reichardt, “An alternatively spliced form of the nerve growth factor receptor TrkA confers an enhanced response to neurotrophin 3,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 91, no. 23, pp. 11133–11137, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. B. L. Hempstead, D. Martin-Zanca, D. R. Kaplan, L. F. Parada, and M. V. Chao, “High-affinity NGF binding requires coexpression of the trk proto-oncogene and the low-affinity NGF receptor,” Nature, vol. 350, no. 6320, pp. 678–683, 1991. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. A. M. Davies, K.-F. Lee, and R. Jaenisch, “p75-deficient trigeminal sensory neurons have an altered response to NGF but not to other neurotrophins,” Neuron, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 565–574, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. D. Mahadeo, L. Kaplan, M. V. Chao, and B. L. Hempstead, “High affinity nerve growth factor binding displays a faster rate of association than p140trk binding. Implications for multi-subunit polypeptide receptors,” Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 269, no. 9, pp. 6884–6891, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. C. Brennan, K. Rivas-Plata, and S. C. Landis, “The p75 neurotrophin receptor influences NT-3 responsiveness of sympathetic neurons in vivo,” Nature Neuroscience, vol. 2, no. 8, pp. 699–705, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. P. S. Mischel, S. G. Smith, E. R. Vining, J. S. Valletta, W. C. Mobley, and L. F. Reichard, “The extracellular domain of p75NTR is necessary to inhibit neurotrophin-3 signaling through TrkA,” The Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 276, no. 14, pp. 11294–11301, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. M. Bibel, E. Hoppe, and Y.-A. Barde, “Biochemical and functional interactions between the neurotrophin receptors trk and p75(NTR),” The EMBO Journal, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 616–622, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. L. Alberti, C. Carniti, C. Miranda, E. Roccato, and M. A. Pierotti, “RET and NTRK1 proto-oncogenes in human diseases,” Journal of Cellular Physiology, vol. 195, no. 2, pp. 168–186, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. C. Strohmaier, B. D. Carter, R. Urfer, Y.-A. Barde, and G. Dechant, “A splice variant of the neurotrophin receptor trkB with increased specificity for brain-derived neurotrophic factor,” The EMBO Journal, vol. 15, no. 13, pp. 3332–3337, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. N. Nguyen, S. B. Lee, Y. S. Lee, K.-H. Lee, and J.-Y. Ahn, “Neuroprotection by NGF and BDNF against neurotoxin-exerted apoptotic death in neural stem cells are mediated through TRK receptors, activating PI3-kinase and MAPK pathways,” Neurochemical Research, vol. 34, no. 5, pp. 942–951, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. R. Holehonnur, S. K. Lella, A. Ho, J. A. Luong, and J. E. Ploski, “The production of viral vectors designed to express large and difficult to express transgenes within neurons,” Molecular Brain, vol. 8, article 12, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  35. E. Y. Snyder, D. L. Deitcher, C. Walsh, S. Arnold-Aldea, E. A. Hartwieg, and C. L. Cepko, “Multipotent neural cell lines can engraft and participate in development of mouse cerebellum,” Cell, vol. 68, no. 1, pp. 33–51, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. D. R. Kaplan and F. D. Miller, “Neurotrophin signal transduction in the nervous system,” Current Opinion in Neurobiology, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 381–391, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. M. V. Chao, “Neurotrophins and their receptors: a convergence point for many signalling pathways,” Nature Reviews Neuroscience, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 299–309, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. A. Simi and C. F. Ibáñez, “Assembly and activation of neurotrophic factor receptor complexes,” Developmental Neurobiology, vol. 70, no. 5, pp. 323–331, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. B. Schütz, R. Damadzic, E. Weihe, and L. E. Eiden, “Identification of a region from the human cholinergic gene locus that targets expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter to a subset of neurons in the medial habenular nucleus in transgenic mice,” Journal of Neurochemistry, vol. 87, no. 5, pp. 1174–1183, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. B. Berse, I. Lopez-Coviella, and J. K. Blusztajn, “Activation of TrkA by nerve growth factor upregulates expression of the cholinergic gene locus but attenuates the response to ciliary neurotrophic growth factor,” Biochemical Journal, vol. 342, no. 2, pp. 301–308, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. B. Lavoie and A. Parent, “Pedunculopontine nucleus in the squirrel monkey: distribution of cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons in the mesopontine tegmentum with evidence for the presence of glutamate in cholinergic neurons,” Journal of Comparative Neurology, vol. 344, no. 2, pp. 190–209, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus