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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 905648, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/905648
Research Article

Clinical Usefulness of Immunohistochemical Staining of p57kip2 for the Differential Diagnosis of Complete Mole

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Iino Hospital, 4-3-2 Fuda, Chōfu, Tokyo 182-0024, Japan
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital and Showa University School of Medicine, 35-1 Chigasaki Chuo, Tsuduki-Ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 224-8503, Japan
3Department of Pathology, Showa University School of Medicine and Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, 35-1 Chigasaki Chuo, Tsuduki-Ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 224-8503, Japan
4Maternity Clinic Kojima, 4-1-27 Asahi-Cho, Akishima, Tokyo 196-0025, Japan

Received 28 September 2014; Accepted 13 January 2015

Academic Editor: Shalini Rajaram

Copyright © 2015 Shigeru Sasaki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

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