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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 915606, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/915606
Review Article

Modeling the Generation of Phase-Amplitude Coupling in Cortical Circuits: From Detailed Networks to Neural Mass Models

Department of Radiology and Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada T3A 2E1

Received 27 March 2015; Revised 28 July 2015; Accepted 6 August 2015

Academic Editor: Vincenzo Romei

Copyright © 2015 Roberto C. Sotero. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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