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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 948131, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/948131
Research Article

Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Granulomatous Lesions in a Mouse Model of Latent Tuberculous Infection

The Institute of Biochemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 2 Timakova Street, Novosibirsk 630117, Russia

Received 4 July 2014; Accepted 21 October 2014

Academic Editor: Monica Fedele

Copyright © 2015 Elena Ufimtseva. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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