Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 958695, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/958695
Research Article

Myofibroblast Expression in Skin Wounds Is Enhanced by Collagen III Suppression

1Department of Surgery, King Saud University, P.O. Box 18097, Riyadh 11415, Saudi Arabia
2College of Medicine Research Center, King Saud University, P.O. Box 18097, Riyadh 11415, Saudi Arabia
3Department of Pathology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11415, Saudi Arabia

Received 27 October 2014; Revised 6 February 2015; Accepted 7 February 2015

Academic Editor: Christian Schwentner

Copyright © 2015 Mohammed M. Al-Qattan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. L. Van De Water, S. Varney, and J. J. Tomasek, “Mechano regulation of the myofibroblast in wound contraction, scarring and fibrosis; opportunities for new therapeutic intervention,” Advances in Wound Care, vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 122–141, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  2. N. Vedrenne, B. Coulomb, A. Danigo, F. Bonté, and A. Desmoulière, “The complex dialogue between (myo)fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix during skin repair processes and ageing,” Pathologie Biologie, vol. 60, no. 1, pp. 20–27, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. B. Hinz, “Formation and function of the myofibroblast during tissue repair,” Journal of Investigative Dermatology, vol. 127, no. 3, pp. 526–537, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. N. L. Sharma, V. K. Mahajan, N. Gupta, N. Ranjan, and A. Lath, “Ehlers-Danlos syndrome—vascular type (ecchymotic variant): cutaneous and dermatopathologic features,” Journal of Cutaneous Pathology, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 486–492, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. D. P. Germain, “Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV,” Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, vol. 2, no. 1, article 32, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. S. W. Volk, Y. Wang, E. A. Mauldin, K. W. Liechty, and S. L. Adams, “Diminished type III collagen promotes myofibroblast differentiation and increases scar deposition in cutaneous wound healing,” Cells Tissues Organs, vol. 194, no. 1, pp. 25–37, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. A. Kumar, J. W. Godwin, P. B. Gates, A. A. Garza-Garcia, and J. P. Brockes, “Molecular basis for the nerve dependence of limb regeneration in an adult vertebrate,” Science, vol. 318, no. 5851, pp. 772–777, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. M. M. Al-Qattan, M. K. Shier, M. M. Abd-Alwahed et al., “Salamander-derived, human-optimized nAG protein suppresses collagen synthesis and increases collagen degradation in primary human fibroblasts,” BioMed Research International, vol. 2013, Article ID 384091, 9 pages, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. M. M. Al-Qattan, M. M. Abd-Al Wahed, K. Hawary, A. A. Alhumidi, and M. K. Shier, “Recombinant nAG (a salamander-derived protein) decreases the formation of hypertrophic scarring in the rabbit ear model,” BioMed Research International, vol. 2014, Article ID 121098, 5 pages, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. E. Rahmani-Neishaboor, F. M.-K. Yau, R. Jalili, R. T. Kilani, and A. Ghahary, “Improvement of hypertrophic scarring by using topical anti-fibrogenic/anti-inflammatory factors in a rabbit ear model,” Wound Repair and Regeneration, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 401–408, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. J. H. Ko, P. S. Kim, Y. Zhao, S. J. Hong, and T. A. Mustoe, “HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) reduce hypertrophic scar formation in a rabbit ear wounding model,” Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, vol. 129, no. 2, pp. 252e–261e, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. D. E. Morris, L. Wu, L. L. Zhao et al., “Acute and chronic animal models for excessive dermal scarring: quantitative studies,” Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, vol. 100, no. 3, pp. 674–681, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. N. Zoppi, R. Gardella, A. de Paepe, S. Barlati, and M. Colombi, “Human fibroblasts with mutations in COL5A1 and COL3A1 genes do not organize collagens and fibronectin in the extracellular matrix, down-regulate α2β1 integrin, and recruit αvβ3 Instead of α5β1 Integrin,” The Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 279, no. 18, pp. 18157–18168, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. A. Biernacka, M. Dobaczewski, and N. G. Frangogiannis, “TGF-β signaling in fibrosis,” Growth Factors, vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 196–202, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. A. J. Watt, C. M. Curtin, and V. R. Hentz, “Collagenase injection as non-surgical treatment of Dupuytren’s disease: 8-year follow-up,” The Journal of Hand Surgery, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 534–539, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. C. A. Peimer, P. Blazar, S. Coleman et al., “Dupuytren contracture recurrence following treatment with collagenase clostridium histolyticum (CORDLESS study): 3-year data,” The Journal of Hand Surgery—American Volume, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 12–22, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. W. M. Rozen, Y. Edirisinghe, and J. Crock, “Late complications of clinical Clostridium histolyticum collagenase use in Dupuytren's disease,” PLoS ONE, vol. 7, no. 8, Article ID e43406, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus